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MarinersTalk40 #33 -- Patrick Kivlehan, 3b

From the gridiron to the diamond

PATRICK KIVLEHAN, 3b ... ONE-STOP SHOPPING

2013 Age: 23 ... 6-foot-2, 210 ... drafted in the 4th round of the 2012 draft out of Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey

Cheesy MarinersTalk.com catchphrase: DB TO 3b!

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Baseball-Reference.com Stat Line:

Year Age Tm Lg Lev Aff G PA AB H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2012 22 Everett NORW A- SEA 72 316 282 85 17 3 12 52 14 1 19 93 .301 .373 .511 .883
1 Season       72 316 282 85 17 3 12 52 14 1 19 93 .301 .373 .511 .883
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 3/19/2013.
 
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Key 2012 splits imported from MinorLeagueCentral.com:

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Spectometer STAT-Scan:

More explanation of the stats here.  If you find this too small, at least in Firefox you can right-click and click "View Image" to enlarge (not sure about other browsers).  Essentially, the more color the better.

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Moving Pictures:

Patrick Kivlehan, 3B Seattle Mariners

 

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Fun Facts to Know and Tell:

  • Rutgers, you may know, played in the first college football game ever, in 1869, defeating Princeton, 6-4.
  • After that, the Scarlet Knights didn't do much of note until Greg Schiano arrived in 2001.  That's 130 years of mediocrity.
  • Why are we talking about football?  Because, of course, Kivlehan went to Rutgers to play football for Schiano and with the likes of Ray Rice (they didn't overlap on the same roster).
  • Then, after not playing baseball since high school in 2008, he decided (after using up his football eligibility) to try again his senior year in 2012.
  • He ended up as Big East Player of the Year (or maybe we should say Whatever Teams Happen to be Calling Themselves the "Big East" at This Particular Moment Player of the Year ... but that's not his fault), and a high draft pick of the Mariners.

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Bottom Line:

Three Numbers (confused? help here): Plate Skills: 49  Production: 83  Composite:  32

Everyone loves Kivlehan more than me, and that's fine.  Everyone liked Alex Liddi and Casper Wells more than me, too.  And (almost) everyone loved Michael Saunders less.  So we'll see.

Kivlehan started out with literally zero walks.  "Literally" as in actually, truly, he finished the month of June with no walks at all.  He got a lot better in the "BB" column, but ... not in the "K" column.

If you're going to strike out way more than 20% of plate appearances, you need to send the ball over the wall at Russ Branyan or Mark Reynolds rates, and you better draw a lot of walks.  Maybe Kivlehan can pull that off (he has great physical ability), but he's got a long way to go. 

It took me awhile, but I figured out why Kivlehan's actual numbers were so much better than they were "supposed to" be -- and the answer was 13 HBP in 72 games, and that drove his OBP up a bunch.  I count HBP as essentially random.  So, if you believe that Kivlehan will continue to get a bunch of HBP to augment his walks, then I understand.

But it is still extraordinarily rare for someone to succeed in baseball while strking out in 30% of plate appearances, so I'm still cool on Kivlehan until I see that change (or I see his HR and BB numbers go way up).

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And finally:

It says that Kivlehan is in this video of Rutgers pro day (NFL pro day) in 2010 (#47, it says), but I think that's a mistake.  If anyone spots him, though, let me know.  (I don't think he would have been eligible for the draft in 2010 anyway.)  Sort of a "Where's Waldo" exercise.

Rutgers Pro Day Action